Newsletter 30: Spring 2016

PD Newsletter 30.png

The Leadenhall Building by Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners, 2015 © Paul Raftery

Welcome to the Pidgeon Digital Newsletter 30: Spring 2016.

Pidgeon Digital has made amazing progress in the last couple of years, and there are now 276 talks, compared with just 75 when the archive was first published over 10 years ago.

We are now on Twitter. Please follow us @PidgeonDigital. We’ll be tweeting about our new talks as they’re released, and keeping you up to date with architecture in general.

Please see the posts below for descriptions of our recently added talks, now in easy to access digital format.

 

Sir Norman Foster: Chateau Margaux, France

PD Foster.png

Chateau Margaux, France by Sir Norman Foster, 2015 © Nigel Young for Foster + Partners

Sir Norman Foster is one of the world’s pre-eminent architects. With his practice Foster + Partners, Lord Foster has designed every possible building type, and worked in every corner of the globe, picking up numerous awards and accolades along the way.

For his recently completed winery for Chateau Margaux, Lord Foster drew on the local vernacular to create a different addition to the famous estate. In this talk he discusses why he became so personally involved with the project, about combining recycled materials with cutting edge technology, and his client’s delight at the new building’s understated boldness.

Recorded at Foster + Partners’ London office in September 2015.

Click here for a preview of this talk.

The complete talk can be purchased here. Please see here for details of how to subscribe to the full Pidgeon Digital website which contains over 275 other talks.

Graham Stirk: The Leadenhall Building, The Servant & The Served

PD Stirk.png

The Leadenhall Building by Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners, 2015 © Richard Bryant. Courtesy of British Land/Oxford Properties

In this talk Graham Stirk discusses the Leadenhall Building – a speculative office tower in London’s financial district. The tower is inclined along the south side to avoid blocking a key view of St Paul’s Cathedral, with core services housed in a vertical “cassette” on the north side. The concept of distinct served and servant spaces, borrowed from Louis Kahn, recurs throughout the work of the practice.

Stirk also explores the challenges of building across the street from the Lloyd’s Register of Shipping – the first building he worked on after graduation and, in contrast to Leadenhall, one of the most bespoke office buildings on the planet, and explains the 11 year lag between commission and completion.

Recorded at Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners’ office in London in March 2015.

Click here for a preview of this talk.

The complete talk can be purchased here. You can see here details of how to subscribe to the full Pidgeon Digital website which contains over 275 other talks.

Frank Lloyd Wright: The World’s Greatest Architect

PD Frank Lloyd Wright

Frank Lloyd Wright © The Library Of Congress

With a brief personalised introduction by John Peter, Frank Lloyd Wright informally discusses his childhood, his experience working with Louis Sullivan, a number of his famous buildings, Taliesin, his life and architectural convictions with both criticism and humour.

This talk was recorded in 1955.

Click here for a preview of this talk.

The complete talk can be purchased here. You can see here details of how to subscribe to the full Pidgeon Digital website which contains over 275 other talks.

Jørn Utzon & Louis Kahn: Sydney Opera House

PD Utzon & Kahn

Sydney Opera House, clearly showing the outline of its “sails” © Enoch Lau

This rare recording by the Australian Broadcasting Corporation features the NSW Premier Jo Cahill and Jørn Utzon speaking at the launch of the Sydney Opera house appeal on 7 August 1957; and a discussion between Henry Ashworth, Professor of Architecture at University of Sydney and Chairman of the Opera House competition jury, and his fellow assessors Eero Saarinen and Sir Leslie Martin, Professor of Architecture at Cambridge University, on 29 January 1957. We are grateful to Warwick Mehaffey, Acoustics Engineer at ABC and advisor to the SOH for sourcing the recordings.

This talk was recorded in 1957.

Click here for a preview of this talk.

The complete talk can be purchased here. You can see here details of how to subscribe to the full Pidgeon Digital website which contains over 275 other talks.

 

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe: I Don’t Want To Be Interesting, I Want To Be Good

PD Mies talk

Seagram Building, Park Avenue, New York © Peter Murray

Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969), one of the pioneering masters of 20th century architecture, talks about his education and background, his time at the Bauhaus, his relationship with Peter Behrens and approach to architecture. The images that illustrate the interview are of the Seagram Building, one of his most seminal buildings, designed in 1958.

This talk was recorded in 1955.

Click here for a preview of this talk

The complete talk can be purchased here. Please see here for details of how to subscribe to the full Pidgeon Digital website which contains over 275 other talks.

Richard Neutra: The Most Precious Material Is The Human Material

PD Neutra talk

House near Hamburg by Richard Neutra, 1966 © Alan Blanc

Richard Neutra is famous for adapting the International Style to Southern California, with domestic projects that included the Lovell House, the von Sternberg House and the Kaufmann House.

Here is a fascinating excerpt of Neutra exploring the psychological and biological approach behind his work – reflective of the intellectual environment of the Vienna of his youth…

The complete talk can be purchased here. You can see here details of how to subscribe to the full Pidgeon Digital website which contains 275 other talks.

Philip Johnson: Now We Have A Style

Philip Johnson - Now We Have A style

Philip Johnson weekend house & guest house, New Canaan, Conn. 1949 © Tadeusz Barucki

Philip Johnson helped bring modernism to the United States. As the first director of the Museum of Modern Art’s department of architecture and design, he co-curated MoMA’s seminal 1932 exhibition on the International Style.

His own work as an architect, including the Seagram Building designed with Mies van der Rohe, and the Glass House, his own residence in New Canaan, Connecticut, helped to establish the new architecture, while his later work helped move the style on to post-modernism and deconstructivism.

This interview, one of a series conducted by architectural publisher John Peter, was recorded over several sessions between 1955 and 1961.

In this excerpt, Johnson explains his choice of the three greatest modernist works. He argued that with modernism providing the foundation for a new golden age of architecture, it was time to push at the boundaries of the new style.

The complete talk can be purchased here. Please see here for details of how to subscribe to the full Pidgeon Digital website which contains over 275 other talks.